Making a Maine Mountain Soap

So, I finally decided to bite the bullet and enter one of the spectacular Amy Warden's Soap Challenge Club challenges. The challenge this month spoke to me, because it is a Winter Wonderland theme. Since I live in Maine, where we are in winter for about 10 months out of the year, I am flooded with inspiration day in and day out, every time I look outside.  But that's not exactly why it spoke to me.  The truth is, I have been wanting to make a soap that resembles a very famous logo of one of our state's most beloved ski resorts for quite some time now.  The problem is, I had no idea how I was going to tackle this, so I spent many a weary evening obsessing while tossing and turning and running design ideas through my rattled mind.  And let me tell you, this required some engineering, which is definitely not my strong suit. So, check out what I worked out...

Here is where I started...a milk carton.

Behold: the milk carton is transformed into a triangle mold, with the help of its trusty friend, Packaging Tape.

 And now, the triangle milk carton stands tall to be fixed to the bottom of the carton by some masking tape.

And now, the triangle milk carton stands tall to be fixed to the bottom of the carton by some masking tape.

 The mold is then lined with freezer paper, and trimmed up at the top just to neaten things up a bit.

The mold is then lined with freezer paper, and trimmed up at the top just to neaten things up a bit.

 Next, a piece of card stock is trimmed up to add something special to this project.

Next, a piece of card stock is trimmed up to add something special to this project.

 Very carefully, I fold the card stock to create the perfect mountain peaks effect.

Very carefully, I fold the card stock to create the perfect mountain peaks effect.

 The peaked card stock is fit into the mold in a very particular fashion.

The peaked card stock is fit into the mold in a very particular fashion.

 Alas, she is fastened with the ever-popular washi tape.

Alas, she is fastened with the ever-popular washi tape.

 Now, we mix the sodium hydroxide with distilled spring water.  In Maine, we have the best way to cool the lye water. Here is mine, sitting in the snow.

Now, we mix the sodium hydroxide with distilled spring water.  In Maine, we have the best way to cool the lye water. Here is mine, sitting in the snow.

 While the lye water is cooling,  and the solid oils are melting on the stove, I get my mica and titanium dioxide ready ready.

While the lye water is cooling,  and the solid oils are melting on the stove, I get my mica and titanium dioxide ready ready.

 Titanium dioxide is premixed with oil.

Titanium dioxide is premixed with oil.

 Aaaaahhhhh...the oils are all melted and ready, the mold is set up, the colors are premixed and waiting, and all I need is the lye water to get this party started.

Aaaaahhhhh...the oils are all melted and ready, the mold is set up, the colors are premixed and waiting, and all I need is the lye water to get this party started.

 Here I am, mixing the lye water to the oils.

Here I am, mixing the lye water to the oils.

 Time to mix it together to reach emulsification.

Time to mix it together to reach emulsification.

 Now, I'll just pour the soap into the containers with the colorants.

Now, I'll just pour the soap into the containers with the colorants.

 And stir in the fragrance oils...

And stir in the fragrance oils...

 Now, I carefully pour the soap into the correct side of the divider.

Now, I carefully pour the soap into the correct side of the divider.

 This takes some careful concentration to keep the blue and white separated.  I pour a little on each side at a time.

This takes some careful concentration to keep the blue and white separated.  I pour a little on each side at a time.

 Once I have it filled up, I need to carefully remove the divider.

Once I have it filled up, I need to carefully remove the divider.

 Take note of my very serious face.  I was trying very hard not to swear about the soap pouring out of the bottom of the mold while my sweet, eleven-year-old daughter  was photographing the experience.

Take note of my very serious face.  I was trying very hard not to swear about the soap pouring out of the bottom of the mold while my sweet, eleven-year-old daughter  was photographing the experience.

 I managed to get what I could into the mold, without any promises to the many who want to place future orders on this soap. It's a messy nightmare.  We shall see what becomes of it.

I managed to get what I could into the mold, without any promises to the many who want to place future orders on this soap. It's a messy nightmare.  We shall see what becomes of it.

 This is the dream.

This is the dream.